BART KOSKO NOISE PDF

BART KOSKO NOISE PDF

June 18, 2020

Debunking this and many other commonly held beliefs about noise, Kosko gives readers a vivid sense of how deeply noise permeates both the world around us. The science commentator author of the best-selling Fuzzy Thinking presents a scientific history of noise for general readers, defining noise as. Neural network and ‘fuzzy thinking’ researcher Bart Kosko is briefly interviewed in this month’s Wired where he argues that adding noise to a.

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Noise is a social nuisance, a cause of deafness and high blood pressure, and an all-around annoyance. But what is noise really? Today, noise is considered the curse of the information age, but, in fact, not all noise is bad. Debunking this and many other commonly held beliefs about noise, Kosko gives readers a vivid sense of how deeply noise permeates both the world around us and within us. The result is a vastly entertaining and illuminating scientific journey that promises to do for noise what James Gleick did for chaos—make it vital, fascinating, and relevant.

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Preview — Noise by Bart Kosko. Noise by Bart Kosko.

From the well-known science commentator and bestselling author of Fuzzy Thinking comes a revelatory look at the phenomenon of noise A celebrated maverick in the world of science, Bart Kosko introduced—and continues to popularize in print and television media—the revolutionary concept of fuzzy logic.

In his latest book, he provides the first scientific history of noise aim From the well-known science commentator and bestselling author of Fuzzy Thinking comes a revelatory look at the phenomenon of noise A celebrated maverick in the world of science, Bart Kosko introduced—and continues to popularize in print and television media—the revolutionary concept of fuzzy logic.

In his latest book, he provides the first scientific history of noise aimed at the general reader. Hardcoverpages. Published August 17th by Viking Adult first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about Noiseplease sign up. Lists with This Book. Jan 24, Rossdavidh rated it really liked it Shelves: I recently finished reading “Noise”, by Bart Kosko.

At least, I think I finished it. The book didn’t really end.

Bart Kosko on noise and optimisation

It just sort of stopped. Bart Kosko is an electrical engineering professor at USC. He has written books on topics like fuzzy logic not to be confused with wooly thinking. This book is on noise, as opposed to signal, but taken in the broad sometimes metaphorical sense. So, we learn about things like how “urban great tits” sic sing at higher minimum frequencies in urban areas, just I recently finished reading “Noise”, by Bart Kosko. So, we learn about things like how “urban great tits” sic sing at higher minimum frequencies in urban areas, just to be heard over all the clatter of the city.

Or that a humpback whale song can be decibels loud in water, not quite as loud as a rocket engine, but louder than a jet engine or a 12 gauge shotgun kind of blows their New Age image, for me. Or that the actress Hedy Lamarr was co-inventor with a composer and writer named George Antheil of frequency-hopping spread spectrum communication, despite neither she nor Antheil having any formal background or experience in related fields.

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There are a few parts you may want to skim, if for example the idea that much of the “real world” noise that engineers assume is Gaussian, may really be Cauchian, is not one which seems to you worth spending some time to consider. But, put another way, it’s less abstract. Gaussian noise assumes that the random, background stuff is distributed like a bell, with a tiny bit of a flare. The widest part of the bell isn’t all that wider than the middle part.

That kind of noise is like wind noise on the beach at night. Cauchian noise assumes that random, background stuff has occasional weirdness, that’s way different than the normal stuff. Sometimes this is called “popcorn noise”, because like popcorn popping there are occasional random events that are way bigger than the norm.

If IQ’s were distributed this way instead of with a Gaussian curvewe’d find an occasional person with an IQ of But, if we design everything with normal noise in mind, and what we get is popcorn noise instead, we could be in trouble.

Which is where I thought Kosko was headed with this book. Instead, he takes a kind of aimless walk through a bunch of topics on noise, then stops.

Not stops the aimlessness, just stops the book.

I was taken by surprise by its end in part because, after pages of text, there’s 90 pages of notes at the end, so the thickness of book left made me think we weren’t close to done. Maybe it’s a self-referential joke, to have such an unpredictable end?

Maybe he ran out of steam, and it was time to close the thing and collect the paycheck? Maybe the topic of noise is inherently hard to organize into a coherent narrative? No matter, I liked the book anyway. Consider it bad branding: Enjoy the one about the difference between pink noise and brown noise, or why white noise is impossible.

Read about the student who, for one of Kosko’s classes, designed a device to cancel the noise in his apartment when the nearby school let the kids out for recess and fantasize about buying such a device.

Questions?

Then, whenever Kosko runs out of topics to tell you about, just stop. Nov 02, Andrew Skretvedt rated it liked it Shelves: If you what a better treatment on this, how we’ve grown into noisy environments as a society and how we deal with the impact of noise, I recommend “Discord: The Story of N working from recent memory, the book’s already gone back to the library This title is less about the social and cultural impacts of noise as well as its evolution in our environment although it curiously and almost boringly went on at length about law regarding nuisance, grazing even areas that weren’t noise focused at all.

The Story of Noise” by Mike Goldsmith. His treatment includes a fairly rich historical overview which I enjoyed. The subject that this book keeps lingering over, one I believe is an area of specific expertise for the author, was about stochastic resonance.

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It’s a subject that is rather fascinating which I knew nothing about: The most repeated example the book gives is an extremely high-contrast picture of a baboon or whatever, I think I saw a pretty girl in onethe book used a black and white example for ease of printing. You cannot really tell what it is at first. Then some noise is added, and the result is an instantly recognizable and useful image, with the effect being just like using diffusion dither to simulate shades of grey in a medium that is strictly black and white.

Add too much noise, and the image is lost again in featureless snow. The end-notes are quite extensive, and amount to almost one-third of the entire book. They also get quite math heavy, suitable to someone with experience or interest in the field, whereas the book text is written for a lay reader. Also of note was the interesting discussion of noise “colors” white noise, pink noise, brown noise, etc.

Feb 12, penny shima glanz rated it liked it Shelves: This was quite a fascinating read and I learned in theory, I promptly forgot most of it a ton about noise and signals and all that stuff I never bothered to study before.

I found the quotes at the start of each chapter the most fascinating. Apr 22, Don rated it really liked it. Jan 22, Marwan rated it really liked it Recommends it for: It provided an interesting perspective on what exactly noise is, and how he thinks it differentiates from music.

Noise is a nuisance.

Bart Kosko – Wikipedia

But not this book. I thought it was very good, so i’m going to give it a solid 4 stars. Oct noiwe, Stephen rated it really liked it. Extraordinarily interesting subject matter, rather clumsily explained. He either spends too much time explaining simple concepts, or blasting through college courses in a paragraph.

Gets 4 stars for doing what all nonfiction should: This was a great noiee to bridge academic writing with popular science. It definitely challenges the reader to keep up especially if you take in all the End Notes. I also appreciated the author’s own voice coming through. Aug 04, Cheryl marked it as xx-dnf-skim-reference.

Not engaging to me.

Doesn’t seem to be headed to any point that needs so many pages to discuss. Michael rated it liked it Aug 28, Alex rated it really liked it Dec 22, Rick rated it it was ok Feb 10, Shannon rated it liked it Feb 28, Mangoo rated it liked it Jan 11, Ric Ruttum rated kozko it was ok Sep 30, Eran Nosie rated it liked it Sep 07, Wright rated it liked it May 03, Monica Marie rated it really liked it Jul 31, Lester Cockram rated it really liked it Oct 26, Reuben rated it really liked it Feb 03,

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